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Pain management/relief 


 Si Yuan Balanced Method


Flavia Dale has specialized in the Si Yuan Balanced Method developed by Dr. Tan, which is a method that promotes Instant Clinical Results.

Li Gan Jian Ying 立竿見影 means “stand a pole and see its shadow”. The Balance Method is known in the acupuncture community as a system which gets instant results after needle insertion. Live demonstrations and hands-on classroom training continue to prove to thousands of practitioners and their patients that this system works immediately.

To help illustrate the Balance Method, we have shared the following videos. They are neither produced nor owned by Si Yuan.

To watch the video, please kindly click on the corresponding link.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XAh87vxS32k

tennis elbow

Tennis Elbow

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Back pain

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Knee pain

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Golfers Elbow



Migranes

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Period pain/cramps

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Acupuncture and pain relief


Back Pain and Acupuncture

January 15, 2017

Back pain can affect anyone at any age and most people will suffer from it at some point in their lives. It is the UK's leading cause of disability and one of the main reasons for work-related sickness absence.

The condition affects more than 1.1 million people in the UK, with 95% of patients suffering from problems affecting the lower back. Back pain currently costs the NHS and community care services more than £1 billion each year*. Most lower back pain is caused not by serious damage or disease, but by sprains, muscle strains, minor injuries, or a pinched or irritated nerve. It can also occur during pregnancy, or because of stress, viral infection or a kidney infection.


How acupuncture can help


Research has shown that acupuncture is significantly better than no treatment and at least as good as (if not better than) standard medical care for back pain (Witt 2006; Haake 2007; Cherkin 2009; Sherman 2009a). It appears to be particularly useful as an adjunct to conventional care, for patients with more severe symptoms and for those wishing to avoid analgesic drugs (Sherman 2009a, 2009b; Lewis 2010). It may help back pain in pregnancy (Ee 2008) and work-related back pain, with fewer work-days lost (Weidenhammer 2007; Sawazaki 2008). Acupuncture has in some meta-analyses been found superior to sham acupuncture (Hopton 2010) while in others the advantage was not statistically significant (Yuan 2008; Ammendolia 2008). The sham interventions are not inactive placebos, but effectively different versions of acupuncture, so their value in evaluating treatment efficacy is highly questionable (Sherman 2009a). (See Table overleaf).

Acupuncture can help back pain by:

providing pain relief - by stimulating nerves located in muscles and other tissues, acupuncture leads to release of endorphins and other neurohumoral factors and changes the processing of pain in the brain and spinal cord (Pomeranz 1987; Zhao 2008).

reducing inflammation - by promoting release of vascular and immunomodulatory factors (Kim 2008, Kavoussi 2007;Zijlstra 2003).

improving muscle stiffness and joint mobility - by increasing local microcirculation (Komori 2009), which aids dispersal of swelling and bruising.

reducing the use of medication for back complaints (Thomas 2006).

providing a more cost-effective treatment over a longer period of time (Radcliffe 2006;Witt 2006).

improving the outcome when added to conventional treatments such as rehabilitation exercises (Ammendolia 2008; Yuan 2008).

Related links

NHS choices logo

The NHS Choices site mentions acupuncture being recommmended by NICE : http://www.nhs.uk/Conditions/Acupuncture/Pages/What-is-it-used-for.aspx

Backcare logo

BackCare is a national charity that aims to reduce the impact of back pain on society by providing information, support, promoting good practice and funding research- visit their page about acupuncture : http://www.backcare.org.uk/360/Acupuncture.html

Additional Info

Terms and conditions:

Terms and conditions The use of this fact sheet is for the use of British Acupuncture Council members and is subject to the strict conditions imposed by the British Acupuncture Council details of which can be found in the members area of its website www.acupuncture.org.uk.

Source: https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/back-pain.html


Migranes and Acupuncture

February 14, 2017

Migraine is a primary headache disorder manifesting as recurring attacks, usually lasting for 4 to 72 hours and involving pain of moderate to severe intensity (IHS 2004).

Typical characteristics of the headache are unilateral location, pulsating quality, moderate or severe intensity, and aggravation by routine physical activity. Sufferers may also experience auras, photophobia, phonophobia, nausea and vomiting. Migraine is a common disorder (Olesen 2007); a UK follow-up study found the migraine incidence rate to be 3.69 cases per 1,000 person-years, and to be around 2.5 times higher in women than men (Becker 2008).

Many people with migraine can be adequately treated when the attacks occur, but some need prophylactic interventions, as their attacks are either too frequent or are insufficiently controlled in this way. Several drugs, such as beta-blockers, amitriptyline or sodium valproate, are used in the prophylaxis of migraine in an attempt to reduce attack frequency, but all these drugs are associated with adverse effects (DTB 1998).

References

Becker C et al. Migraine incidence, comorbidity and health resource utilization in the UK. Cephalalgia 2008;28:57-64.

IHS 2004. Headache Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society. The International Classification of Headache Disorders: 2nd edition. Cephalalgia 2004;24:1-160.

Managing migraine. Drug and Therapeutics Bulletin 1998;36:41-44

Olesen J et al. Funding of headache research in Europe. Cephalalgia 2007;27:995-9.

How acupuncture can help

There have now been many controlled trials of acupuncture for migraine, with some large, high-quality ones in recent years. The results of the latest reviews are quite consistent: acupuncture is significantly better than no treatment/basic care for managing migraine, and appears to be at least as effective as prophylactic drug therapy, with few contraindications or unpleasant side effects (Linde 2009, Wang 2008, Sun 2008, Scott 2008). Acupuncture has a similar or slightly better effect than sham procedures, which themselves can perform as well as conventional drugs, indicating that sham acupuncture is not an inactive placebo but a contentious alternative intervention. Acupuncture has been found to be cost-effective (Witt 2008; Wonderling 2004). As well as prevention it may also be used to alleviate symptoms in acute attacks (Li 2009). There is preliminary qualitative evidence from patients that acupuncture can increase coping mechanisms as well as relieve migraine symptoms (Rutberg 2009).

Migraine is thought to begin as an electrical phenomenon in the cerebrum that then affects blood vessels, biochemistry, and causes neurogenic inflammation.

Acupuncture can help in the treatment of migraine by:

Providing pain relief - by stimulating nerves located in muscles and other tissues, acupuncture leads to release of endorphins and other neurochumoral factors and changes the processing of pain in the brain and spinal cord (Zhao 2008, Zijlstra 2003, Pomeranz, 1987)

Reducing inflammation - by promoting release of vascular and immunomodulatory factors (Kim 2008, Kavoussi 2007, Zijlstra 2003).

Reducing the degree of cortical spreading depression (an electrical wave in the brain associated with migraine) and plasma levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P (both implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine) (Shi 2010).

Modulating extracranial and intracranial blood flow (Park 2009).

Affecting serotonin (5-hydroxytriptamine) levels in the brain (Zhong 2007). (Serotonin may be linked to the initiation of migraines; 5-HT agonists (triptans) are used against acute attacks.)

Find out more at Migraine Action

Additional Info

Terms and conditions:

Terms and conditions The use of this fact sheet is for the use of British Acupuncture Council members and is subject to the strict conditions imposed by the British Acupuncture Council details of which can be found in the members area of its website www.acupuncture.org.uk.

Source: https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/migraines.html


Tennis Elbow

March 15, 2017

Tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis) is characterised by pain and tenderness over the lateral epicondyle of the humerus. In the UK, the annual incidence of lateral elbow pain in general practice is around 4/1000 to 7/1000 people.(Hamilton 1986) It is most common in people aged between 40 and 50 years (Allander 1974); for example, the incidence is as much as 10% in women aged 42 to 46 years.(Chard 1989; Verhaar 1994)

Tennis elbow is considered an overload injury, and it typically occurs after minor trauma of the extensor muscles of the forearm; tennis is a direct cause in only 5% of people with the condition.(Murtagh 1988). It is primarily a type of tendonitis though the muscles and bones of the epicondyle joint may also be involved. Pain can also occur on the inner side of the elbow, which is known as golfer's elbow. Although generally self-limiting, symptoms of tennis elbow can persist for 1.5 to 2 years or even longer in a minority of people.(Hudak 1996)

The aims of conventional medical interventions are to relieve pain, control inflammation and accelerate repair in order to improve function. Treatments include corticosteroid injections, topical and oral NSAIDs, other analgesics, exercises, ultrasound, orthoses and surgery.

References

Allander E. Prevalence, incidence and remission rates of some common rheumatic diseases and syndromes. Scand J Rheumatol 1974; 3: 145-53.

Chard MD, Hazleman BL. Tennis elbow - a reappraisal. Br J Rheumatol 1989; 28: 186-90.

Hamilton P. The prevalence of humeral epicondylitis: a survey in general practice. J R Coll Gen Pract 1986; 36: 464-5.

Hudak P et al. Understanding prognosis to improve rehabilitation: the example of lateral elbow pain. Arch Phys Rehabil 1996; 77: 568-93.

Murtagh J. Tennis elbow. Aust Fam Physician 1988; 17: 90-1, 94-5.

Verhaar J. Tennis elbow: anatomical, epidemiological and therapeutic aspects. Int Orthop 1994; 18: 263-7.

How acupuncture can help

One systematic review concluded that acupuncture was beneficial for pain, at least in the short term, although the amount of evidence was limited (Green 2002). Two years later, a second review with more data available, found strong evidence of short-term pain relief (Trinh 2004). Most randomised controlled trials not included in these systematic reviews have compared different types of acupuncture, so can tell us little about the overall effectiveness of acupuncture for the treatment of tennis elbow.(Su 2010; Gu 2007; Xia 2004; Tsui 2002) One trial, however, compared electroacupuncture plus moxibustion with lidocaine plus prednisone treatment, and found the acupuncture treatment to be more effective.(Jiang 2005) The fact sheet on Sports Injuries has more information on other tendinopathies.

In general, acupuncture is believed to stimulate the nervous system and cause the release of neurochemical messenger molecules. The resulting biochemical changes influence the body's homeostatic mechanisms, thus promoting physical and emotional well-being. Stimulation of certain acupuncture points has been shown to affect areas of the brain that are known to reduce sensitivity to pain and stress, as well as promoting relaxation and deactivating the 'analytical' brain, which is responsible for anxiety (Wu 1999).

Acupuncture may help relieve symptoms of tennis elbow, such as pain and inflammation by:

stimulating nerves located in muscles and other tissues, which leads to release of endorphins and other neurohumoral factors (e.g. neuropeptide Y, serotonin), and changes the processing of pain in the brain and spinal cord (Pomeranz 1987, Han 2004, Zhao 2008, Zhou 2008, Lee 2009, Cheng 2009);

delivering analgesia via alpha-adrenoceptor mechanisms (Koo 2008);

increasing the release of adenosine, which has antinociceptive properties (Goldman 2010);

modulating the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network (Hui 2009);

reducing inflammation, by promoting release of vascular and immunomodulatory factors (Kavoussi 2007, Zijlstra 2003);

improving muscle stiffness and joint mobility by increasing local microcirculation (Komori 2009), which aids dispersal of swelling.

About the British Acupuncture Council

With over 3000 members, the British Acupuncture Council (BAcC) is the UK's largest professional body for traditional acupuncturists. Membership of the BAcC guarantees excellence in training, safe practice and professional conduct. To find a qualified traditional acupuncturist, contact the BAcC on 020 8735 0400 or visit www.acupuncture.org.uk

Additional Info

Terms and conditions:

Terms and conditions The use of this fact sheet is for the use of British Acupuncture Council members and is subject to the strict conditions imposed by the British Acupuncture Council details of which can be found in the members area of its website www.acupuncture.org.uk.

Source: https://www.acupuncture.org.uk/a-to-z-of-conditions/a-to-z-of-conditions/tennis-elbow.html


Si Yuan Balanced Method video samples